Karl Rove on the Tea Party’s impact in the 2010 elections

In recent weeks, political strategist Karl Rove has been at the center of discourse around the 2010 mid-term elections.

The former senior adviser and deputy chief of staff to former President George W. Bush believes that Democrats will suffer a “punishing defeat” in the midterm elections. But most recently, he’s been all over TV, radio and the web because of his criticism of the Republican’s senate nominee, Christine O’Donnell, who just last week won the Republican primary in Delaware. Rove called her “nutty,” referred to her background as “checkered” and believes she is going to lose. This has put Rove at odds with the current bigwigs of his party.

His words have frustrated many party leaders on the right. By some, he is viewed as part of the problem — he is a Washington insider and the Tea Party is an outsider movement. This, of course, sets up an interesting test for this movement when Tea Party candidates go to Washington. How will they operate as elected officials and keep the Tea Partiers happy?

Rove has stood strong on his beliefs that the Tea Party remain estranged from both the Democrats and Republicans. As he put it in a Wall Street Journal opinion piece, “The tea party movement will be more effective than it otherwise would be if it refuses to allow itself to become an appendage of either major political party.”

Next Monday, September 27, Karl Rove will appear at the Constitution Center to discuss the 2010 mid-term elections. Center President and CEO David Eisner will moderate the discussion, which will address the political landscape, polling, candidates and the immediate and long-term implcations of the November vote.

We’ll ask Rove some important questions about the Tea Party — their impact on the election, the GOP, and what the priorities of the party will be with “anti-establishment” elected officials.

And we’ll also hear personal insights from the political strategist about what it takes to win elections, political combat, and his service to country and the conservative cause.

Get your tickets today, or sound-off in the comments.

Comments

comments

Comments

  1. says

    I predict this will likely come out better as compared to any are predicting. We don’t want to jinx it when you’re overly optimistic and the media want to lower our expectations so as to suppress the vote.