Should Congress pass a law preventing smartphone data from being used by private companies? [VIDEO]

Teacher’s corner

While the parameters of internet privacy are evolving daily, there are interesting court decisions that can help provide lawmakers with guidance such as State v. Reid (2008) and even an earlier case prior to cell phone technology, Smith v. Maryland (1979).

Apple and Google were in the congressional hot seat last week over the issue of mobile phone privacy.

Company officials recently testified at a Senate hearing called in response to concerns about how iPhones, Androids and other mobile devices collect data about their owners’ locations. The technology, they said, is used to track nearby cellphone towers and Wi-Fi hotspots in order to offer users better service.

The issue of smartphone data collection is the latest episode in an ongoing debate over privacy and technology. In coming months, Congress will continue to explore how to update federal laws to protect privacy in the digital age.

Should Congress pass a law preventing smartphone data from being used by private companies? Here’s what some visitors to the Constitution Center had to say on the subject:

Stefan Frank is the National Constitution Center’s Director of Digital Engagement and manager of Constitution Daily’s Twitter account @ConDailyBlog. Follow us!

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