Sep 13

Issue: Congress RSS

A new National Constitution Center-AP poll finds that Congress is the least trusted branch of government



Posted 2 years, 7 months ago.

By

Over the past year – one in which the country faced gridlock over the national debt and a near government shutdown – American opinion reflects the nation’s volatility, a new poll released today by The Associated Press and the National Constitution Center indicates.

U.S. Capitol (Flickr image from cliff1066)

Among key findings is a notable decrease in the number of Americans who oppose giving the president more power to improve the economy – down to 61% from 73% in last year’s poll, a change that takes on new significance in light of President Obama’s recent jobs speech.

In other findings:

  • 82% of Americans believe the federal government should not have the power to require all Americans to buy health insurance.
  •  Faith in Congress also has reached a new low, with 57% of Americans having little or no confidence in the nation’s legislative branch (up from 49% in 2010).
  • Of the 19 different institution in this year’s poll — including the Supreme Court, local and state governments, the media, publc schools and organized religion — the U.S. Congress ranked as the least trusted.
  • The U.S. military earned the deepest respect, holding the confidence of 54% of Americans.

 The new poll, conducted in August, is the fourth in an annual series that tracks public opinion on constitutional issues.  For a copy of the complete survey, click here.



Comments:

Comments

  1. Just to add a little perspective: The Founding Fathers did not trust any of the branches of government out of principle which is why they seem to have designed ours after the 3-legged bar stools they balanced themselves upon during the tempestuous political debates in the pub. They knew four legs would have been better in theory by reading John Locke but settled for imperfection due to budgetary constraints and also out of pragmatic counter-principle. Left with just the three, chew down one leg down no matter which and the whole thing tips you over–a purposeful emblem to wear on the breast.

    Presumably, they reserved their Trust for God as minted on the coin–which in their day as far as giving them any political direction wasn’t worth a Continental. (albeit it was a bit later before the “In God We Trust” emblem (not Congress) was literally coined based on supposed premises of antecedents).

    So while there are problems with Congress this is a poorly formed question.

  2. Just to add a little perspective: The Founding Fathers did not trust any of the branches of government out of principle which is why they seem to have designed ours after the 3-legged bar stools they balanced themselves upon during the tempestuous political debates in the pub. They knew four legs would have been better in theory by reading John Locke but settled for imperfection due to budgetary constraints and also out of pragmatic counter-principle. Left with just the three, chew down one leg down no matter which and the whole thing tips you over–a purposeful emblem to wear on the breast.

    Presumably, they reserved their Trust for God as minted on the coin–which in their day as far as giving them any political direction wasn’t worth a Continental. (albeit it was a bit later before the “In God We Trust” emblem (not Congress) was literally coined based on supposed premises of antecedents).

    So while there are problems with Congress this is a poorly formed question.

  3. Just to add a little perspective: The Founding Fathers did not trust any of the branches of government out of principle which is why they seem to have designed ours after the 3-legged bar stools they balanced themselves upon during the tempestuous political debates in the pub. They knew four legs would have been better in theory by reading John Locke but settled for imperfection due to budgetary constraints and also out of pragmatic counter-principle. Left with just the three, chew down one leg down no matter which and the whole thing tips you over–a purposeful emblem to wear on the breast.

    Presumably, they reserved their Trust for God as minted on the coin–which in their day as far as giving them any political direction wasn’t worth a Continental. (albeit it was a bit later before the “In God We Trust” emblem (not Congress) was literally coined based on supposed premises of antecedents).

    So while there are problems with Congress this is a poorly formed question.

  4. Just to add a little perspective: The Founding Fathers did not trust any of the branches of government out of principle which is why they seem to have designed ours after the 3-legged bar stools they balanced themselves upon during the tempestuous political debates in the pub. They knew four legs would have been better in theory by reading John Locke but settled for imperfection due to budgetary constraints and also out of pragmatic counter-principle. Left with just the three, chew down one leg down no matter which and the whole thing tips you over–a purposeful emblem to wear on the breast.

    Presumably, they reserved their Trust for God as minted on the coin–which in their day as far as giving them any political direction wasn’t worth a Continental. (albeit it was a bit later before the “In God We Trust” emblem (not Congress) was literally coined based on supposed premises of antecedents).

    So while there are problems with Congress this is a poorly formed question.

  5. Just to add a little perspective: The Founding Fathers did not trust any of the branches of government out of principle which is why they seem to have designed ours after the 3-legged bar stools they balanced themselves upon during the tempestuous political debates in the pub. They knew four legs would have been better in theory by reading John Locke but settled for imperfection due to budgetary constraints and also out of pragmatic counter-principle. Left with just the three, chew down one leg down no matter which and the whole thing tips you over–a purposeful emblem to wear on the breast.

    Presumably, they reserved their Trust for God as minted on the coin–which in their day as far as giving them any political direction wasn’t worth a Continental. (albeit it was a bit later before the “In God We Trust” emblem (not Congress) was literally coined based on supposed premises of antecedents).

    So while there are problems with Congress this is a poorly formed question.

  6. Just to add a little perspective: The Founding Fathers did not trust any of the branches of government out of principle which is why they seem to have designed ours after the 3-legged bar stools they balanced themselves upon during the tempestuous political debates in the pub. They knew four legs would have been better in theory by reading John Locke but settled for imperfection due to budgetary constraints and also out of pragmatic counter-principle. Left with just the three, chew down one leg down no matter which and the whole thing tips you over–a purposeful emblem to wear on the breast.

    Presumably, they reserved their Trust for God as minted on the coin–which in their day as far as giving them any political direction wasn’t worth a Continental. (albeit it was a bit later before the “In God We Trust” emblem (not Congress) was literally coined based on supposed premises of antecedents).

    So while there are problems with Congress this is a poorly formed question.

  7. Just to add a little perspective: The Founding Fathers did not trust any of the branches of government out of principle which is why they seem to have designed ours after the 3-legged bar stools they balanced themselves upon during the tempestuous political debates in the pub. They knew four legs would have been better in theory by reading John Locke but settled for imperfection due to budgetary constraints and also out of pragmatic counter-principle. Left with just the three, chew down one leg down no matter which and the whole thing tips you over–a purposeful emblem to wear on the breast.

    Presumably, they reserved their Trust for God as minted on the coin–which in their day as far as giving them any political direction wasn’t worth a Continental. (albeit it was a bit later before the “In God We Trust” emblem (not Congress) was literally coined based on supposed premises of antecedents).

    So while there are problems with Congress this is a poorly formed question.

  8. Just to add a little perspective: The Founding Fathers did not trust any of the branches of government out of principle which is why they seem to have designed ours after the 3-legged bar stools they balanced themselves upon during the tempestuous political debates in the pub. They knew four legs would have been better in theory by reading John Locke but settled for imperfection due to budgetary constraints and also out of pragmatic counter-principle. Left with just the three, chew down one leg down no matter which and the whole thing tips you over–a purposeful emblem to wear on the breast.

    Presumably, they reserved their Trust for God as minted on the coin–which in their day as far as giving them any political direction wasn’t worth a Continental. (albeit it was a bit later before the “In God We Trust” emblem (not Congress) was literally coined based on supposed premises of antecedents).

    So while there are problems with Congress this is a poorly formed question.

  9. Just to add a little perspective: The Founding Fathers did not trust any of the branches of government out of principle which is why they seem to have designed ours after the 3-legged bar stools they balanced themselves upon during the tempestuous political debates in the pub. They knew four legs would have been better in theory by reading John Locke but settled for imperfection due to budgetary constraints and also out of pragmatic counter-principle. Left with just the three, chew down one leg down no matter which and the whole thing tips you over–a purposeful emblem to wear on the breast.

    Presumably, they reserved their Trust for God as minted on the coin–which in their day as far as giving them any political direction wasn’t worth a Continental. (albeit it was a bit later before the “In God We Trust” emblem (not Congress) was literally coined based on supposed premises of antecedents).

    So while there are problems with Congress this is a poorly formed question.

  10. Just to add a little perspective: The Founding Fathers did not trust any of the branches of government out of principle which is why they seem to have designed ours after the 3-legged bar stools they balanced themselves upon during the tempestuous political debates in the pub. They knew four legs would have been better in theory by reading John Locke but settled for imperfection due to budgetary constraints and also out of pragmatic counter-principle. Left with just the three, chew down one leg down no matter which and the whole thing tips you over–a purposeful emblem to wear on the breast.

    Presumably, they reserved their Trust for God as minted on the coin–which in their day as far as giving them any political direction wasn’t worth a Continental. (albeit it was a bit later before the “In God We Trust” emblem (not Congress) was literally coined based on supposed premises of antecedents).

    So while there are problems with Congress this is a poorly formed question.

  11. Just to add a little perspective: The Founding Fathers did not trust any of the branches of government out of principle which is why they seem to have designed ours after the 3-legged bar stools they balanced themselves upon during the tempestuous political debates in the pub. They knew four legs would have been better in theory by reading John Locke but settled for imperfection due to budgetary constraints and also out of pragmatic counter-principle. Left with just the three, chew down one leg down no matter which and the whole thing tips you over–a purposeful emblem to wear on the breast.

    Presumably, they reserved their Trust for God as minted on the coin–which in their day as far as giving them any political direction wasn’t worth a Continental. (albeit it was a bit later before the “In God We Trust” emblem (not Congress) was literally coined based on supposed premises of antecedents).

    So while there are problems with Congress this is a poorly formed question.

  12. Just to add a little perspective: The Founding Fathers did not trust any of the branches of government out of principle which is why they seem to have designed ours after the 3-legged bar stools they balanced themselves upon during the tempestuous political debates in the pub. They knew four legs would have been better in theory by reading John Locke but settled for imperfection due to budgetary constraints and also out of pragmatic counter-principle. Left with just the three, chew down one leg down no matter which and the whole thing tips you over–a purposeful emblem to wear on the breast.

    Presumably, they reserved their Trust for God as minted on the coin–which in their day as far as giving them any political direction wasn’t worth a Continental. (albeit it was a bit later before the “In God We Trust” emblem (not Congress) was literally coined based on supposed premises of antecedents).

    So while there are problems with Congress this is a poorly formed question.

  13. Just to add a little perspective: The Founding Fathers did not trust any of the branches of government out of principle which is why they seem to have designed ours after the 3-legged bar stools they balanced themselves upon during the tempestuous political debates in the pub. They knew four legs would have been better in theory by reading John Locke but settled for imperfection due to budgetary constraints and also out of pragmatic counter-principle. Left with just the three, chew down one leg down no matter which and the whole thing tips you over–a purposeful emblem to wear on the breast.

    Presumably, they reserved their Trust for God as minted on the coin–which in their day as far as giving them any political direction wasn’t worth a Continental. (albeit it was a bit later before the “In God We Trust” emblem (not Congress) was literally coined based on supposed premises of antecedents).

    So while there are problems with Congress this is a poorly formed question.

  14. Just to add a little perspective: The Founding Fathers did not trust any of the branches of government out of principle which is why they seem to have designed ours after the 3-legged bar stools they balanced themselves upon during the tempestuous political debates in the pub. They knew four legs would have been better in theory by reading John Locke but settled for imperfection due to budgetary constraints and also out of pragmatic counter-principle. Left with just the three, chew down one leg down no matter which and the whole thing tips you over–a purposeful emblem to wear on the breast.

    Presumably, they reserved their Trust for God as minted on the coin–which in their day as far as giving them any political direction wasn’t worth a Continental. (albeit it was a bit later before the “In God We Trust” emblem (not Congress) was literally coined based on supposed premises of antecedents).

    So while there are problems with Congress this is a poorly formed question.

  15. Just to add a little perspective: The Founding Fathers did not trust any of the branches of government out of principle which is why they seem to have designed ours after the 3-legged bar stools they balanced themselves upon during the tempestuous political debates in the pub. They knew four legs would have been better in theory by reading John Locke but settled for imperfection due to budgetary constraints and also out of pragmatic counter-principle. Left with just the three, chew down one leg down no matter which and the whole thing tips you over–a purposeful emblem to wear on the breast.

    Presumably, they reserved their Trust for God as minted on the coin–which in their day as far as giving them any political direction wasn’t worth a Continental. (albeit it was a bit later before the “In God We Trust” emblem (not Congress) was literally coined based on supposed premises of antecedents).

    So while there are problems with Congress this is a poorly formed question.

  16. Just to add a little perspective: The Founding Fathers did not trust any of the branches of government out of principle which is why they seem to have designed ours after the 3-legged bar stools they balanced themselves upon during the tempestuous political debates in the pub. They knew four legs would have been better in theory by reading John Locke but settled for imperfection due to budgetary constraints and also out of pragmatic counter-principle. Left with just the three, chew down one leg down no matter which and the whole thing tips you over–a purposeful emblem to wear on the breast.

    Presumably, they reserved their Trust for God as minted on the coin–which in their day as far as giving them any political direction wasn’t worth a Continental. (albeit it was a bit later before the “In God We Trust” emblem (not Congress) was literally coined based on supposed premises of antecedents).

    So while there are problems with Congress this is a poorly formed question.

  17. Just to add a little perspective: The Founding Fathers did not trust any of the branches of government out of principle which is why they seem to have designed ours after the 3-legged bar stools they balanced themselves upon during the tempestuous political debates in the pub. They knew four legs would have been better in theory by reading John Locke but settled for imperfection due to budgetary constraints and also out of pragmatic counter-principle. Left with just the three, chew down one leg down no matter which and the whole thing tips you over–a purposeful emblem to wear on the breast.

    Presumably, they reserved their Trust for God as minted on the coin–which in their day as far as giving them any political direction wasn’t worth a Continental. (albeit it was a bit later before the “In God We Trust” emblem (not Congress) was literally coined based on supposed premises of antecedents).

    So while there are problems with Congress this is a poorly formed question.

  18. Just to add a little perspective: The Founding Fathers did not trust any of the branches of government out of principle which is why they seem to have designed ours after the 3-legged bar stools they balanced themselves upon during the tempestuous political debates in the pub. They knew four legs would have been better in theory by reading John Locke but settled for imperfection due to budgetary constraints and also out of pragmatic counter-principle. Left with just the three, chew down one leg down no matter which and the whole thing tips you over–a purposeful emblem to wear on the breast.

    Presumably, they reserved their Trust for God as minted on the coin–which in their day as far as giving them any political direction wasn’t worth a Continental. (albeit it was a bit later before the “In God We Trust” emblem (not Congress) was literally coined based on supposed premises of antecedents).

    So while there are problems with Congress this is a poorly formed question.

  19. Just to add a little perspective: The Founding Fathers did not trust any of the branches of government out of principle which is why they seem to have designed ours after the 3-legged bar stools they balanced themselves upon during the tempestuous political debates in the pub. They knew four legs would have been better in theory by reading John Locke but settled for imperfection due to budgetary constraints and also out of pragmatic counter-principle. Left with just the three, chew down one leg down no matter which and the whole thing tips you over–a purposeful emblem to wear on the breast.

    Presumably, they reserved their Trust for God as minted on the coin–which in their day as far as giving them any political direction wasn’t worth a Continental. (albeit it was a bit later before the “In God We Trust” emblem (not Congress) was literally coined based on supposed premises of antecedents).

    So while there are problems with Congress this is a poorly formed question.

  20. Just to add a little perspective: The Founding Fathers did not trust any of the branches of government out of principle which is why they seem to have designed ours after the 3-legged bar stools they balanced themselves upon during the tempestuous political debates in the pub. They knew four legs would have been better in theory by reading John Locke but settled for imperfection due to budgetary constraints and also out of pragmatic counter-principle. Left with just the three, chew down one leg down no matter which and the whole thing tips you over–a purposeful emblem to wear on the breast.

    Presumably, they reserved their Trust for God as minted on the coin–which in their day as far as giving them any political direction wasn’t worth a Continental. (albeit it was a bit later before the “In God We Trust” emblem (not Congress) was literally coined based on supposed premises of antecedents).

    So while there are problems with Congress this is a poorly formed question.

  21. Just to add a little perspective: The Founding Fathers did not trust any of the branches of government out of principle which is why they seem to have designed ours after the 3-legged bar stools they balanced themselves upon during the tempestuous political debates in the pub. They knew four legs would have been better in theory by reading John Locke but settled for imperfection due to budgetary constraints and also out of pragmatic counter-principle. Left with just the three, chew down one leg down no matter which and the whole thing tips you over–a purposeful emblem to wear on the breast.

    Presumably, they reserved their Trust for God as minted on the coin–which in their day as far as giving them any political direction wasn’t worth a Continental. (albeit it was a bit later before the “In God We Trust” emblem (not Congress) was literally coined based on supposed premises of antecedents).

    So while there are problems with Congress this is a poorly formed question.

  22. Just to add a little perspective: The Founding Fathers did not trust any of the branches of government out of principle which is why they seem to have designed ours after the 3-legged bar stools they balanced themselves upon during the tempestuous political debates in the pub. They knew four legs would have been better in theory by reading John Locke but settled for imperfection due to budgetary constraints and also out of pragmatic counter-principle. Left with just the three, chew down one leg down no matter which and the whole thing tips you over–a purposeful emblem to wear on the breast.

    Presumably, they reserved their Trust for God as minted on the coin–which in their day as far as giving them any political direction wasn’t worth a Continental. (albeit it was a bit later before the “In God We Trust” emblem (not Congress) was literally coined based on supposed premises of antecedents).

    So while there are problems with Congress this is a poorly formed question.

  23. Just to add a little perspective: The Founding Fathers did not trust any of the branches of government out of principle which is why they seem to have designed ours after the 3-legged bar stools they balanced themselves upon during the tempestuous political debates in the pub. They knew four legs would have been better in theory by reading John Locke but settled for imperfection due to budgetary constraints and also out of pragmatic counter-principle. Left with just the three, chew down one leg down no matter which and the whole thing tips you over–a purposeful emblem to wear on the breast.

    Presumably, they reserved their Trust for God as minted on the coin–which in their day as far as giving them any political direction wasn’t worth a Continental. (albeit it was a bit later before the “In God We Trust” emblem (not Congress) was literally coined based on supposed premises of antecedents).

    So while there are problems with Congress this is a poorly formed question.

  24. Just to add a little perspective: The Founding Fathers did not trust any of the branches of government out of principle which is why they seem to have designed ours after the 3-legged bar stools they balanced themselves upon during the tempestuous political debates in the pub. They knew four legs would have been better in theory by reading John Locke but settled for imperfection due to budgetary constraints and also out of pragmatic counter-principle. Left with just the three, chew down one leg down no matter which and the whole thing tips you over–a purposeful emblem to wear on the breast.

    Presumably, they reserved their Trust for God as minted on the coin–which in their day as far as giving them any political direction wasn’t worth a Continental. (albeit it was a bit later before the “In God We Trust” emblem (not Congress) was literally coined based on supposed premises of antecedents).

    So while there are problems with Congress this is a poorly formed question.

  25. Just to add a little perspective: The Founding Fathers did not trust any of the branches of government out of principle which is why they seem to have designed ours after the 3-legged bar stools they balanced themselves upon during the tempestuous political debates in the pub. They knew four legs would have been better in theory by reading John Locke but settled for imperfection due to budgetary constraints and also out of pragmatic counter-principle. Left with just the three, chew down one leg down no matter which and the whole thing tips you over–a purposeful emblem to wear on the breast.

    Presumably, they reserved their Trust for God as minted on the coin–which in their day as far as giving them any political direction wasn’t worth a Continental. (albeit it was a bit later before the “In God We Trust” emblem (not Congress) was literally coined based on supposed premises of antecedents).

    So while there are problems with Congress this is a poorly formed question.

  26. Just to add a little perspective: The Founding Fathers did not trust any of the branches of government out of principle which is why they seem to have designed ours after the 3-legged bar stools they balanced themselves upon during the tempestuous political debates in the pub. They knew four legs would have been better in theory by reading John Locke but settled for imperfection due to budgetary constraints and also out of pragmatic counter-principle. Left with just the three, chew down one leg down no matter which and the whole thing tips you over–a purposeful emblem to wear on the breast.

    Presumably, they reserved their Trust for God as minted on the coin–which in their day as far as giving them any political direction wasn’t worth a Continental. (albeit it was a bit later before the “In God We Trust” emblem (not Congress) was literally coined based on supposed premises of antecedents).

    So while there are problems with Congress this is a poorly formed question.

  27. Just to add a little perspective: The Founding Fathers did not trust any of the branches of government out of principle which is why they seem to have designed ours after the 3-legged bar stools they balanced themselves upon during the tempestuous political debates in the pub. They knew four legs would have been better in theory by reading John Locke but settled for imperfection due to budgetary constraints and also out of pragmatic counter-principle. Left with just the three, chew down one leg down no matter which and the whole thing tips you over–a purposeful emblem to wear on the breast.

    Presumably, they reserved their Trust for God as minted on the coin–which in their day as far as giving them any political direction wasn’t worth a Continental. (albeit it was a bit later before the “In God We Trust” emblem (not Congress) was literally coined based on supposed premises of antecedents).

    So while there are problems with Congress this is a poorly formed question.

  28. Just to add a little perspective: The Founding Fathers did not trust any of the branches of government out of principle which is why they seem to have designed ours after the 3-legged bar stools they balanced themselves upon during the tempestuous political debates in the pub. They knew four legs would have been better in theory by reading John Locke but settled for imperfection due to budgetary constraints and also out of pragmatic counter-principle. Left with just the three, chew down one leg down no matter which and the whole thing tips you over–a purposeful emblem to wear on the breast.

    Presumably, they reserved their Trust for God as minted on the coin–which in their day as far as giving them any political direction wasn’t worth a Continental. (albeit it was a bit later before the “In God We Trust” emblem (not Congress) was literally coined based on supposed premises of antecedents).

    So while there are problems with Congress this is a poorly formed question.

  29. Just to add a little perspective: The Founding Fathers did not trust any of the branches of government out of principle which is why they seem to have designed ours after the 3-legged bar stools they balanced themselves upon during the tempestuous political debates in the pub. They knew four legs would have been better in theory by reading John Locke but settled for imperfection due to budgetary constraints and also out of pragmatic counter-principle. Left with just the three, chew down one leg down no matter which and the whole thing tips you over–a purposeful emblem to wear on the breast.

    Presumably, they reserved their Trust for God as minted on the coin–which in their day as far as giving them any political direction wasn’t worth a Continental. (albeit it was a bit later before the “In God We Trust” emblem (not Congress) was literally coined based on supposed premises of antecedents).

    So while there are problems with Congress this is a poorly formed question.

  30. Just to add a little perspective: The Founding Fathers did not trust any of the branches of government out of principle which is why they seem to have designed ours after the 3-legged bar stools they balanced themselves upon during the tempestuous political debates in the pub. They knew four legs would have been better in theory by reading John Locke but settled for imperfection due to budgetary constraints and also out of pragmatic counter-principle. Left with just the three, chew down one leg down no matter which and the whole thing tips you over–a purposeful emblem to wear on the breast.

    Presumably, they reserved their Trust for God as minted on the coin–which in their day as far as giving them any political direction wasn’t worth a Continental. (albeit it was a bit later before the “In God We Trust” emblem (not Congress) was literally coined based on supposed premises of antecedents).

    So while there are problems with Congress this is a poorly formed question.

  31. Just to add a little perspective: The Founding Fathers did not trust any of the branches of government out of principle which is why they seem to have designed ours after the 3-legged bar stools they balanced themselves upon during the tempestuous political debates in the pub. They knew four legs would have been better in theory by reading John Locke but settled for imperfection due to budgetary constraints and also out of pragmatic counter-principle. Left with just the three, chew down one leg down no matter which and the whole thing tips you over–a purposeful emblem to wear on the breast.

    Presumably, they reserved their Trust for God as minted on the coin–which in their day as far as giving them any political direction wasn’t worth a Continental. (albeit it was a bit later before the “In God We Trust” emblem (not Congress) was literally coined based on supposed premises of antecedents).

    So while there are problems with Congress this is a poorly formed question.

  32. Just to add a little perspective: The Founding Fathers did not trust any of the branches of government out of principle which is why they seem to have designed ours after the 3-legged bar stools they balanced themselves upon during the tempestuous political debates in the pub. They knew four legs would have been better in theory by reading John Locke but settled for imperfection due to budgetary constraints and also out of pragmatic counter-principle. Left with just the three, chew down one leg down no matter which and the whole thing tips you over–a purposeful emblem to wear on the breast.

    Presumably, they reserved their Trust for God as minted on the coin–which in their day as far as giving them any political direction wasn’t worth a Continental. (albeit it was a bit later before the “In God We Trust” emblem (not Congress) was literally coined based on supposed premises of antecedents).

    So while there are problems with Congress this is a poorly formed question.

  33. Just to add a little perspective: The Founding Fathers did not trust any of the branches of government out of principle which is why they seem to have designed ours after the 3-legged bar stools they balanced themselves upon during the tempestuous political debates in the pub. They knew four legs would have been better in theory by reading John Locke but settled for imperfection due to budgetary constraints and also out of pragmatic counter-principle. Left with just the three, chew down one leg down no matter which and the whole thing tips you over–a purposeful emblem to wear on the breast.

    Presumably, they reserved their Trust for God as minted on the coin–which in their day as far as giving them any political direction wasn’t worth a Continental. (albeit it was a bit later before the “In God We Trust” emblem (not Congress) was literally coined based on supposed premises of antecedents).

    So while there are problems with Congress this is a poorly formed question.

  34. Just to add a little perspective: The Founding Fathers did not trust any of the branches of government out of principle which is why they seem to have designed ours after the 3-legged bar stools they balanced themselves upon during the tempestuous political debates in the pub. They knew four legs would have been better in theory by reading John Locke but settled for imperfection due to budgetary constraints and also out of pragmatic counter-principle. Left with just the three, chew down one leg down no matter which and the whole thing tips you over–a purposeful emblem to wear on the breast.

    Presumably, they reserved their Trust for God as minted on the coin–which in their day as far as giving them any political direction wasn’t worth a Continental. (albeit it was a bit later before the “In God We Trust” emblem (not Congress) was literally coined based on supposed premises of antecedents).

    So while there are problems with Congress this is a poorly formed question.

  35. Just to add a little perspective: The Founding Fathers did not trust any of the branches of government out of principle which is why they seem to have designed ours after the 3-legged bar stools they balanced themselves upon during the tempestuous political debates in the pub. They knew four legs would have been better in theory by reading John Locke but settled for imperfection due to budgetary constraints and also out of pragmatic counter-principle. Left with just the three, chew down one leg down no matter which and the whole thing tips you over–a purposeful emblem to wear on the breast.

    Presumably, they reserved their Trust for God as minted on the coin–which in their day as far as giving them any political direction wasn’t worth a Continental. (albeit it was a bit later before the “In God We Trust” emblem (not Congress) was literally coined based on supposed premises of antecedents).

    So while there are problems with Congress this is a poorly formed question.

  36. Just to add a little perspective: The Founding Fathers did not trust any of the branches of government out of principle which is why they seem to have designed ours after the 3-legged bar stools they balanced themselves upon during the tempestuous political debates in the pub. They knew four legs would have been better in theory by reading John Locke but settled for imperfection due to budgetary constraints and also out of pragmatic counter-principle. Left with just the three, chew down one leg down no matter which and the whole thing tips you over–a purposeful emblem to wear on the breast.

    Presumably, they reserved their Trust for God as minted on the coin–which in their day as far as giving them any political direction wasn’t worth a Continental. (albeit it was a bit later before the “In God We Trust” emblem (not Congress) was literally coined based on supposed premises of antecedents).

    So while there are problems with Congress this is a poorly formed question.

  37. Just to add a little perspective: The Founding Fathers did not trust any of the branches of government out of principle which is why they seem to have designed ours after the 3-legged bar stools they balanced themselves upon during the tempestuous political debates in the pub. They knew four legs would have been better in theory by reading John Locke but settled for imperfection due to budgetary constraints and also out of pragmatic counter-principle. Left with just the three, chew down one leg down no matter which and the whole thing tips you over–a purposeful emblem to wear on the breast.

    Presumably, they reserved their Trust for God as minted on the coin–which in their day as far as giving them any political direction wasn’t worth a Continental. (albeit it was a bit later before the “In God We Trust” emblem (not Congress) was literally coined based on supposed premises of antecedents).

    So while there are problems with Congress this is a poorly formed question.

  38. Just to add a little perspective: The Founding Fathers did not trust any of the branches of government out of principle which is why they seem to have designed ours after the 3-legged bar stools they balanced themselves upon during the tempestuous political debates in the pub. They knew four legs would have been better in theory by reading John Locke but settled for imperfection due to budgetary constraints and also out of pragmatic counter-principle. Left with just the three, chew down one leg down no matter which and the whole thing tips you over–a purposeful emblem to wear on the breast.

    Presumably, they reserved their Trust for God as minted on the coin–which in their day as far as giving them any political direction wasn’t worth a Continental. (albeit it was a bit later before the “In God We Trust” emblem (not Congress) was literally coined based on supposed premises of antecedents).

    So while there are problems with Congress this is a poorly formed question.

  39. Just to add a little perspective: The Founding Fathers did not trust any of the branches of government out of principle which is why they seem to have designed ours after the 3-legged bar stools they balanced themselves upon during the tempestuous political debates in the pub. They knew four legs would have been better in theory by reading John Locke but settled for imperfection due to budgetary constraints and also out of pragmatic counter-principle. Left with just the three, chew down one leg down no matter which and the whole thing tips you over–a purposeful emblem to wear on the breast.

    Presumably, they reserved their Trust for God as minted on the coin–which in their day as far as giving them any political direction wasn’t worth a Continental. (albeit it was a bit later before the “In God We Trust” emblem (not Congress) was literally coined based on supposed premises of antecedents).

    So while there are problems with Congress this is a poorly formed question.

  40. Just to add a little perspective: The Founding Fathers did not trust any of the branches of government out of principle which is why they seem to have designed ours after the 3-legged bar stools they balanced themselves upon during the tempestuous political debates in the pub. They knew four legs would have been better in theory by reading John Locke but settled for imperfection due to budgetary constraints and also out of pragmatic counter-principle. Left with just the three, chew down one leg down no matter which and the whole thing tips you over–a purposeful emblem to wear on the breast.

    Presumably, they reserved their Trust for God as minted on the coin–which in their day as far as giving them any political direction wasn’t worth a Continental. (albeit it was a bit later before the “In God We Trust” emblem (not Congress) was literally coined based on supposed premises of antecedents).

    So while there are problems with Congress this is a poorly formed question.

  41. Just to add a little perspective: The Founding Fathers did not trust any of the branches of government out of principle which is why they seem to have designed ours after the 3-legged bar stools they balanced themselves upon during the tempestuous political debates in the pub. They knew four legs would have been better in theory by reading John Locke but settled for imperfection due to budgetary constraints and also out of pragmatic counter-principle. Left with just the three, chew down one leg down no matter which and the whole thing tips you over–a purposeful emblem to wear on the breast.

    Presumably, they reserved their Trust for God as minted on the coin–which in their day as far as giving them any political direction wasn’t worth a Continental. (albeit it was a bit later before the “In God We Trust” emblem (not Congress) was literally coined based on supposed premises of antecedents).

    So while there are problems with Congress this is a poorly formed question.

  42. Just to add a little perspective: The Founding Fathers did not trust any of the branches of government out of principle which is why they seem to have designed ours after the 3-legged bar stools they balanced themselves upon during the tempestuous political debates in the pub. They knew four legs would have been better in theory by reading John Locke but settled for imperfection due to budgetary constraints and also out of pragmatic counter-principle. Left with just the three, chew down one leg down no matter which and the whole thing tips you over–a purposeful emblem to wear on the breast.

    Presumably, they reserved their Trust for God as minted on the coin–which in their day as far as giving them any political direction wasn’t worth a Continental. (albeit it was a bit later before the “In God We Trust” emblem (not Congress) was literally coined based on supposed premises of antecedents).

    So while there are problems with Congress this is a poorly formed question.

  43. Just to add a little perspective: The Founding Fathers did not trust any of the branches of government out of principle which is why they seem to have designed ours after the 3-legged bar stools they balanced themselves upon during the tempestuous political debates in the pub. They knew four legs would have been better in theory by reading John Locke but settled for imperfection due to budgetary constraints and also out of pragmatic counter-principle. Left with just the three, chew down one leg down no matter which and the whole thing tips you over–a purposeful emblem to wear on the breast.

    Presumably, they reserved their Trust for God as minted on the coin–which in their day as far as giving them any political direction wasn’t worth a Continental. (albeit it was a bit later before the “In God We Trust” emblem (not Congress) was literally coined based on supposed premises of antecedents).

    So while there are problems with Congress this is a poorly formed question.

  44. Just to add a little perspective: The Founding Fathers did not trust any of the branches of government out of principle which is why they seem to have designed ours after the 3-legged bar stools they balanced themselves upon during the tempestuous political debates in the pub. They knew four legs would have been better in theory by reading John Locke but settled for imperfection due to budgetary constraints and also out of pragmatic counter-principle. Left with just the three, chew down one leg down no matter which and the whole thing tips you over–a purposeful emblem to wear on the breast.

    Presumably, they reserved their Trust for God as minted on the coin–which in their day as far as giving them any political direction wasn’t worth a Continental. (albeit it was a bit later before the “In God We Trust” emblem (not Congress) was literally coined based on supposed premises of antecedents).

    So while there are problems with Congress this is a poorly formed question.

  45. Just to add a little perspective: The Founding Fathers did not trust any of the branches of government out of principle which is why they seem to have designed ours after the 3-legged bar stools they balanced themselves upon during the tempestuous political debates in the pub. They knew four legs would have been better in theory by reading John Locke but settled for imperfection due to budgetary constraints and also out of pragmatic counter-principle. Left with just the three, chew down one leg down no matter which and the whole thing tips you over–a purposeful emblem to wear on the breast.

    Presumably, they reserved their Trust for God as minted on the coin–which in their day as far as giving them any political direction wasn’t worth a Continental. (albeit it was a bit later before the “In God We Trust” emblem (not Congress) was literally coined based on supposed premises of antecedents).

    So while there are problems with Congress this is a poorly formed question.

  46. Just to add a little perspective: The Founding Fathers did not trust any of the branches of government out of principle which is why they seem to have designed ours after the 3-legged bar stools they balanced themselves upon during the tempestuous political debates in the pub. They knew four legs would have been better in theory by reading John Locke but settled for imperfection due to budgetary constraints and also out of pragmatic counter-principle. Left with just the three, chew down one leg down no matter which and the whole thing tips you over–a purposeful emblem to wear on the breast.

    Presumably, they reserved their Trust for God as minted on the coin–which in their day as far as giving them any political direction wasn’t worth a Continental. (albeit it was a bit later before the “In God We Trust” emblem (not Congress) was literally coined based on supposed premises of antecedents).

    So while there are problems with Congress this is a poorly formed question.

  47. Just to add a little perspective: The Founding Fathers did not trust any of the branches of government out of principle which is why they seem to have designed ours after the 3-legged bar stools they balanced themselves upon during the tempestuous political debates in the pub. They knew four legs would have been better in theory by reading John Locke but settled for imperfection due to budgetary constraints and also out of pragmatic counter-principle. Left with just the three, chew down one leg down no matter which and the whole thing tips you over–a purposeful emblem to wear on the breast.

    Presumably, they reserved their Trust for God as minted on the coin–which in their day as far as giving them any political direction wasn’t worth a Continental. (albeit it was a bit later before the “In God We Trust” emblem (not Congress) was literally coined based on supposed premises of antecedents).

    So while there are problems with Congress this is a poorly formed question.

  48. Just to add a little perspective: The Founding Fathers did not trust any of the branches of government out of principle which is why they seem to have designed ours after the 3-legged bar stools they balanced themselves upon during the tempestuous political debates in the pub. They knew four legs would have been better in theory by reading John Locke but settled for imperfection due to budgetary constraints and also out of pragmatic counter-principle. Left with just the three, chew down one leg down no matter which and the whole thing tips you over–a purposeful emblem to wear on the breast.

    Presumably, they reserved their Trust for God as minted on the coin–which in their day as far as giving them any political direction wasn’t worth a Continental. (albeit it was a bit later before the “In God We Trust” emblem (not Congress) was literally coined based on supposed premises of antecedents).

    So while there are problems with Congress this is a poorly formed question.

  49. Just to add a little perspective: The Founding Fathers did not trust any of the branches of government out of principle which is why they seem to have designed ours after the 3-legged bar stools they balanced themselves upon during the tempestuous political debates in the pub. They knew four legs would have been better in theory by reading John Locke but settled for imperfection due to budgetary constraints and also out of pragmatic counter-principle. Left with just the three, chew down one leg down no matter which and the whole thing tips you over–a purposeful emblem to wear on the breast.

    Presumably, they reserved their Trust for God as minted on the coin–which in their day as far as giving them any political direction wasn’t worth a Continental. (albeit it was a bit later before the “In God We Trust” emblem (not Congress) was literally coined based on supposed premises of antecedents).

    So while there are problems with Congress this is a poorly formed question.

  50. Just to add a little perspective: The Founding Fathers did not trust any of the branches of government out of principle which is why they seem to have designed ours after the 3-legged bar stools they balanced themselves upon during the tempestuous political debates in the pub. They knew four legs would have been better in theory by reading John Locke but settled for imperfection due to budgetary constraints and also out of pragmatic counter-principle. Left with just the three, chew down one leg down no matter which and the whole thing tips you over–a purposeful emblem to wear on the breast.

    Presumably, they reserved their Trust for God as minted on the coin–which in their day as far as giving them any political direction wasn’t worth a Continental. (albeit it was a bit later before the “In God We Trust” emblem (not Congress) was literally coined based on supposed premises of antecedents).

    So while there are problems with Congress this is a poorly formed question.

  51. Just to add a little perspective: The Founding Fathers did not trust any of the branches of government out of principle which is why they seem to have designed ours after the 3-legged bar stools they balanced themselves upon during the tempestuous political debates in the pub. They knew four legs would have been better in theory by reading John Locke but settled for imperfection due to budgetary constraints and also out of pragmatic counter-principle. Left with just the three, chew down one leg down no matter which and the whole thing tips you over–a purposeful emblem to wear on the breast.

    Presumably, they reserved their Trust for God as minted on the coin–which in their day as far as giving them any political direction wasn’t worth a Continental. (albeit it was a bit later before the “In God We Trust” emblem (not Congress) was literally coined based on supposed premises of antecedents).

    So while there are problems with Congress this is a poorly formed question.

  52. Just to add a little perspective: The Founding Fathers did not trust any of the branches of government out of principle which is why they seem to have designed ours after the 3-legged bar stools they balanced themselves upon during the tempestuous political debates in the pub. They knew four legs would have been better in theory by reading John Locke but settled for imperfection due to budgetary constraints and also out of pragmatic counter-principle. Left with just the three, chew down one leg down no matter which and the whole thing tips you over–a purposeful emblem to wear on the breast.

    Presumably, they reserved their Trust for God as minted on the coin–which in their day as far as giving them any political direction wasn’t worth a Continental. (albeit it was a bit later before the “In God We Trust” emblem (not Congress) was literally coined based on supposed premises of antecedents).

    So while there are problems with Congress this is a poorly formed question.

  53. Just to add a little perspective: The Founding Fathers did not trust any of the branches of government out of principle which is why they seem to have designed ours after the 3-legged bar stools they balanced themselves upon during the tempestuous political debates in the pub. They knew four legs would have been better in theory by reading John Locke but settled for imperfection due to budgetary constraints and also out of pragmatic counter-principle. Left with just the three, chew down one leg down no matter which and the whole thing tips you over–a purposeful emblem to wear on the breast.

    Presumably, they reserved their Trust for God as minted on the coin–which in their day as far as giving them any political direction wasn’t worth a Continental. (albeit it was a bit later before the “In God We Trust” emblem (not Congress) was literally coined based on supposed premises of antecedents).

    So while there are problems with Congress this is a poorly formed question.

  54. Just to add a little perspective: The Founding Fathers did not trust any of the branches of government out of principle which is why they seem to have designed ours after the 3-legged bar stools they balanced themselves upon during the tempestuous political debates in the pub. They knew four legs would have been better in theory by reading John Locke but settled for imperfection due to budgetary constraints and also out of pragmatic counter-principle. Left with just the three, chew down one leg down no matter which and the whole thing tips you over–a purposeful emblem to wear on the breast.

    Presumably, they reserved their Trust for God as minted on the coin–which in their day as far as giving them any political direction wasn’t worth a Continental. (albeit it was a bit later before the “In God We Trust” emblem (not Congress) was literally coined based on supposed premises of antecedents).

    So while there are problems with Congress this is a poorly formed question.

  55. Just to add a little perspective: The Founding Fathers did not trust any of the branches of government out of principle which is why they seem to have designed ours after the 3-legged bar stools they balanced themselves upon during the tempestuous political debates in the pub. They knew four legs would have been better in theory by reading John Locke but settled for imperfection due to budgetary constraints and also out of pragmatic counter-principle. Left with just the three, chew down one leg down no matter which and the whole thing tips you over–a purposeful emblem to wear on the breast.

    Presumably, they reserved their Trust for God as minted on the coin–which in their day as far as giving them any political direction wasn’t worth a Continental. (albeit it was a bit later before the “In God We Trust” emblem (not Congress) was literally coined based on supposed premises of antecedents).

    So while there are problems with Congress this is a poorly formed question.

  56. Just to add a little perspective: The Founding Fathers did not trust any of the branches of government out of principle which is why they seem to have designed ours after the 3-legged bar stools they balanced themselves upon during the tempestuous political debates in the pub. They knew four legs would have been better in theory by reading John Locke but settled for imperfection due to budgetary constraints and also out of pragmatic counter-principle. Left with just the three, chew down one leg down no matter which and the whole thing tips you over–a purposeful emblem to wear on the breast.

    Presumably, they reserved their Trust for God as minted on the coin–which in their day as far as giving them any political direction wasn’t worth a Continental. (albeit it was a bit later before the “In God We Trust” emblem (not Congress) was literally coined based on supposed premises of antecedents).

    So while there are problems with Congress this is a poorly formed question.

  57. Just to add a little perspective: The Founding Fathers did not trust any of the branches of government out of principle which is why they seem to have designed ours after the 3-legged bar stools they balanced themselves upon during the tempestuous political debates in the pub. They knew four legs would have been better in theory by reading John Locke but settled for imperfection due to budgetary constraints and also out of pragmatic counter-principle. Left with just the three, chew down one leg down no matter which and the whole thing tips you over–a purposeful emblem to wear on the breast.

    Presumably, they reserved their Trust for God as minted on the coin–which in their day as far as giving them any political direction wasn’t worth a Continental. (albeit it was a bit later before the “In God We Trust” emblem (not Congress) was literally coined based on supposed premises of antecedents).

    So while there are problems with Congress this is a poorly formed question.

  58. Just to add a little perspective: The Founding Fathers did not trust any of the branches of government out of principle which is why they seem to have designed ours after the 3-legged bar stools they balanced themselves upon during the tempestuous political debates in the pub. They knew four legs would have been better in theory by reading John Locke but settled for imperfection due to budgetary constraints and also out of pragmatic counter-principle. Left with just the three, chew down one leg down no matter which and the whole thing tips you over–a purposeful emblem to wear on the breast.

    Presumably, they reserved their Trust for God as minted on the coin–which in their day as far as giving them any political direction wasn’t worth a Continental. (albeit it was a bit later before the “In God We Trust” emblem (not Congress) was literally coined based on supposed premises of antecedents).

    So while there are problems with Congress this is a poorly formed question.

  59. Just to add a little perspective: The Founding Fathers did not trust any of the branches of government out of principle which is why they seem to have designed ours after the 3-legged bar stools they balanced themselves upon during the tempestuous political debates in the pub. They knew four legs would have been better in theory by reading John Locke but settled for imperfection due to budgetary constraints and also out of pragmatic counter-principle. Left with just the three, chew down one leg down no matter which and the whole thing tips you over–a purposeful emblem to wear on the breast.

    Presumably, they reserved their Trust for God as minted on the coin–which in their day as far as giving them any political direction wasn’t worth a Continental. (albeit it was a bit later before the “In God We Trust” emblem (not Congress) was literally coined based on supposed premises of antecedents).

    So while there are problems with Congress this is a poorly formed question.

Trackbacks

  1. [...] Two-thirds of respondents wanted to repeal the mandate that Americans have health insurance by 2014 “or pay a fine” in a March Kaiser Family Foundation poll, while just 27 percent preferred to keep that part of the law. By comparison, more than twice as many supported other parts of the law, including Medicare payroll tax increases on the wealthy and closing the Medicare “doughnut hole.” Closer to the Supreme Court’s task, more than eight in 10 said the federal government “should not have the power to require all Americans to buy health insurance” in an August Associated Press-National Constitution Center poll. [...]

  2. [...] Two-thirds of respondents wanted to repeal the mandate that Americans have health insurance by 2014 “or pay a fine” in a March Kaiser Family Foundation poll, while just 27 percent preferred to keep that part of the law. By comparison, more than twice as many supported other parts of the law, including Medicare payroll tax increases on the wealthy and closing the Medicare “doughnut hole.” Closer to the Supreme Court’s task, more than eight in 10 said the federal government “should not have the power to require all Americans to buy health insurance” in an August Associated Press-National Constitution Center poll. [...]

  3. [...] Two-thirds of respondents wanted to repeal the mandate that Americans have health insurance by 2014 “or pay a fine” in a March Kaiser Family Foundation poll, while just 27 percent preferred to keep that part of the law. By comparison, more than twice as many supported other parts of the law, including Medicare payroll tax increases on the wealthy and closing the Medicare “doughnut hole.” Closer to the Supreme Court’s task, more than eight in 10 said the federal government “should not have the power to require all Americans to buy health insurance” in an August Associated Press-National Constitution Center poll. [...]