Clarence Clemons’ Journey to China [VIDEO]

Constitution Daily sat down with international documentary filmmaker Nick Mead, director of “Who Do I Think I Am: A Portrait of a Journey“–featuring the late E Street Band saxophonist Clarence Clemons–to discuss his relationship with Bruce Springsteen, the influence of their music, and the power of free expression.

Mead documented Clemons’ spiritual journey through China following the band’s 2002-2003 “Rising Tour,” a place where he could be anonymous and find himself. Mead describes the trip, and the people they encountered, as accessible and welcoming. In the following clip he describes the only moment of hostility during a visit to the Great Wall, which became a turning point for Clemons and the film.

In describing the relationship between Springsteen and Clemons, and the power of their music, Mead recalled seeing the band at Wembley Stadium in England (Mead, himself, is British) and feeling as though Bruce was speaking directly to him. “Everybody was absolutely mesmerized, 70,000 people totally silent listening to Bruce…I thought, gosh, this guy really understands. It wasn’t just an American dream it was a universal dream. Everyone’s got that.”

Every Friday throughout the run of From Asbury Park to the Promised Land: The Life and Music of Bruce Springsteen, we will publish dedicated content inspired by Bruce Springsteen and the First Amendment. “Freedom of Expression Fridays” will feature unique and original posts by staff writers, musicians, visual artists, and more, with a focus on a range of issues including protest, dissent, and the role of art in politics and political campaigns.

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