Podcast: The constitutional and political impact of Citizens United

Joint_Session_of_Congress535What is the state of elections and campaign finance, six years after the Supreme Court’s landmark ruling in Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission? In that case, the Court held that corporate funding of independent political communications in campaigns for public office cannot be limited under the First Amendment.

Link: Take Our Podcast Survey

Since then, the Court also struck down aggregate limits on individual political contributions in a single election cycle. There have also been proposals to overturn Citizen United with a constitutional amendment. And to this point in the 2016 presidential campaign, super PACs and other outside groups have raised nearly $400 million and spent nearly half that amount.

Joining We the People to explore the constitutional landscape after Citizens United and to assess the decision’s impact on the 2016 election are two leading experts on the front lines of the debate.

David Keating is President of the Center for Competitive Politics.

Paul S. Ryan is Deputy Executive Director of the Campaign Legal Center.


Download this episode (right click and save)


This show was engineered by Kevin Kilbourne and produced by Nicandro Iannacci. Research was provided by Josh Waimberg and Danieli Evans. The host of We the People is Jeffrey Rosen.

We need your help to make this podcast even better! Go to bit.ly/wtpfeedback to share your feedback.

Get the latest constitutional news, and continue the conversation, on our Facebook page and Twitter feed.

We want to know what you think of the podcast. Email us at [email protected].

Please subscribe to We the People. While you’re in the iTunes Store, leave us a rating and review—it helps other people discover what we do.

Please also subscribe to Live at America’s Town Hall, featuring conversations and debates presented at the Center, across from Independence Hall in beautiful Philadelphia.

We the People is a member of Slate’s Panoply network. Check out all of our sibling podcasts at iTunes.com/Panoply.

Despite our congressional charter, the National Constitution Center is a private nonprofit—we receive little government support, and we rely on the generosity of people around the country who are inspired by our nonpartisan mission of constitutional debate and education. Please consider becoming a member to support our work, including this podcast. Visit constitutioncenter.org to learn more.

Recent Stories on Constitution Daily

Constitution Check: Do famous people own their own celebrity identities?

The Democratic nomination contest and the revival of liberalism

Podcast: In Apple v. FBI, who should win?

Comments

comments