“Can we talk” about the equal rights amendment?

As the country examines the tone of political dialogue, Alison Young provides a regular commentary under the title “Can We Talk? A Conversation about Civility and Democracy in America” exploring the current state of public discourse and civility in American politics. March is women’s history month, and any conversation about the progress of women in […]

Gender politics and the start of Women’s History Month

In February 1980, President Jimmy Carter declared the week of March 8 to be National Women’s History Week. By Presidential Proclamation, Carter called on Americans to commemorate the unsung contributions of American women of years past.

Constitution Check: How far can states go to dictate medical procedures?

As long ago as the late 19th Century, the Supreme Court began recognizing that, in American law, it would be an illegal assault to require an individual to undergo a medical procedure without that person’s consent.

Constitution Check: Is the constitutionality of the “war on terrorism” a settled issue?

Ten years have passed since the U.S. government opened the military detention facility at the U.S. Naval base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, symbolizing an energetic effort to round up suspected terrorists. Perhaps a decade might have been long enough for the constitutional issues over war-on-terrorism policies to get settled. That hasn’t happened, though.

President and CEO? Beware of the “Businessman in Chief”

Back in the early 1970s, a professor at the Harvard Business School introduced a public sector case study for class discussion: the students were asked to analyze the paper flow in the office of then-senator Ted Kennedy.